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About knee replacement

The knee joint


The knee joint is formed by three bones with the support of ligaments and muscles. The large bone in your thigh is called the femur. On the opposing end is the tibia (shin bone). Along with the patella (knee cap), the knee joint is held together by several ligaments. These ligaments interact with the leg muscles to stabilise and control the motion of the knee and protect it from damage. Between the weight-bearing surfaces of the knee, a layer of cartilage helps the bony surfaces of the knee move smoothly against one another.

Total knee replacement

Total knee replacement


Total knee replacement is a surgical procedure in which the bone surfaces and cartilage that have been damaged or worn away are removed and replaced with artificial surfaces (‘implants’ or ‘prostheses’) made of metal or a plastic material. The resultant artificial joint is designed to move, as far as possible, like a natural healthy knee

OMNIBotics: Robotic-assisted total knee replacement

OMNIBotics: Robotic-assisted total knee replacement


OMNIBotics® is a robotic-assisted procedure designed to help total knee patients experience a quicker recovery with less pain. Robotic instrumentation is used to properly align and balance the joint, two factors that can significantly affect overall stability and recovery.

Nicholas Day’s patient story

Nicholas Day’s patient story


Nicholas led a very active lifestyle, but was restricted due to his knee pain. After consulting with surgeons, he decided to undergo total knee arthroplasty. Watch the video to hear about his experience.

Frequently asked questions

Frequently asked questions

If you have chronic knee pain that restricts regular activities, chronic stiffness of the knee, constant knee instability, or a severe deformity of the knee, then you are likely a good candidate for a total knee replacement. As always, it is best to discuss possible treatments with your surgeon.

Consult your surgeon about your general health and your ability to withstand surgery. In general, age is not a factor for knee replacement surgery if you are in reasonably good health and you have the desire to continue pursuing an active and productive life.

You should experience significant reduction in pain and improved mobility after knee replacement surgery. Many factors, including physical condition, weight, activity level, personal anatomy and willingness to comply with your surgeon’s instructions prior to and after surgery will play an important role in your recovery.

As with most surgeries, you should expect considerable amounts of tenderness on the repaired area. Pain medication will be given to you during the hospital stay and the pain should decrease over several weeks.

Your surgeon will discuss with you all of the details regarding your surgery including how long the procedure is expected to take. Most knee replacement surgeries take approximately two hours. Some of this time is taken by the operating room staff to prepare for surgery.

In most cases, knee replacement patients are discharged from two to three days. Some facilities will allow you to go home, under supervision, within 24 hours. If you need more time for rehabilitation, your surgeon and physical therapist will work out a recovery plan.

You should be able to stand and walk with assistance soon after surgery. Physical therapy will begin as soon as you feel ready, generally one to two days after surgery.

You should expect six weeks or more of physical therapy before you can completely resume your normal activities. In general, however, you should be able to partake in certain low-impact activities within a few weeks. This will depend on multiple factors, including your health, the type of surgery and your recovery. Typically surgeons discourage patients from any high impact activities such as running and other strenuous sports. Complete recovery usually takes several months.