Login

About hip replacement

The hip joint


The hip joint is a ball and socket joint that connects the body to the legs. The leg bone (femur) fits into the socket of the pelvis, called the acetabulum. These bones are protected by muscles, ligaments, cartilage and joint fluid that provide a smooth surface for the bones to move. When working properly, the hip joint permits a wide range of motion, and is used in almost every type of physical activity.

Most patients with significant hip disease have a limp and one leg may feel shorter than the other. Bone-on-bone contact means that you may occasionally feel or hear the hip creaking during walking. As the disease progresses, the hip becomes stiff and less movement is possible – and total hip replacement can be considered for treatment.

Total hip replacement

Total hip replacement


Total hip replacement implants are designed to replace affected areas with components that re-create healthy hip joint mechanics. The main components of an artificial hip consist of the acetabular component (socket), the femoral component (thigh bone), and the femoral head (ball). With each of these components working together, you should be able to regain your hip movement without pain. 

Various factors, including individual patient anatomy can influence the results of a hip replacement. After a physical assessment of your hip joint, your surgeon will determine what procedure is necessary to get you back to a normal, active life.

Optimized Positioning System (OPS™)

Optimized Positioning System (OPS™)


Every patient moves differently, and your total hip replacement should account for this. Corin's OPS™ technology helps surgeons optimise your hip replacement, incorporating a unique imaging process to allow your surgeon to analyze how you move and achieve a personalised solution.*

Learn More

James' story


James led a very active lifestyle, but was sidelined due to hip pain. After consulting with surgeons, he decided to undergo total hip arthroplasty. Watch the video to hear about his experience.

Frequently asked questions

Frequently asked questions

If you have chronic and persistent hip pain that restricts regular activities, it is likely that you are a good candidate for a total hip replacement. As always, it is best to discuss possible treatments with your surgeon.

Consult your surgeon about your general health and your ability to withstand surgery. In general, age is not a factor for hip replacement surgery if you are in reasonably good health and you have the desire to continue pursuing an active and productive life.

You should experience significant reduction in pain and improved mobility after hip replacement surgery within the first few weeks. Many factors, including physical condition, weight, activity level, personal anatomy and willingness to comply with your surgeon’s instructions prior to and after surgery will play an important role in your recovery.

As with most surgeries you should expect considerable amounts of tenderness on the repaired area. Pain medication will be given to you during the hospital stay and the pain should decrease over several weeks.

If you have chronic and persistent hip pain that restricts regular activities, it is likely that you are a good candidate for a total hip replacement. As always, it is best to discuss possible treatments with your surgeon.

You should be able to stand and walk with assistance soon after surgery. Physical therapy will begin as soon as you feel ready, generally one to two days after surgery. You should expect six weeks or more of physical therapy before you can completely resume your normal activities. In general, however, you should be able to partake in certain low-impact activities within a few weeks. This will depend on multiple factors, including your health, the type of surgery and your recovery. Typically surgeons discourage patients from any high impact activities such as running and other strenuous sports. Complete recovery usually takes several months.